Aida’s Portfolio

Mundane as Beautiful

 

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Jonah’s Portfolio

Jonah Hillman

Between Two Worlds

 

In Italy, architecture plays a large role in understanding history as well as being able to absorb the culture of a new environment. Knowing this, I wanted to flip some ideas of classic architecture around, and add a modern, alternative twist. By using contrasting ideas of black and white vs. color, I was able to create a feeling of two worlds existing in one photograph, from which the series is aptly named. By getting out of the traditional boundaries that photography sometimes seems to set for artists, I really was able to see what aspects of photography I often include without knowing it. For example, negative space is one idea in photography where the subject is not present, or where no action seems to be taking place. Over these three weeks, I noticed that a large majority of my photos seemed to include some form of negative space, which I’ve found to be one of my favorite elements of art. After Spoleto, I want to continue to make my own style, rather that believing that I have to follow ideas that are favored by others.
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Jonah Hillman

Sticking Out

 

Throughout our street photography unit, we focused on finding a subject or subjects in a scene and portraying their relationships to one another. This for me was very challenging, as it required me to step out of my comfort zone and often get very close to the subjects I was photographing. At first glance, these photos don’t all go together, as there is one photo which seems to not fit the theme set in place for this series. But there’s a reason for this.  In these four works, I wanted to show how I could make a subject really stick out amongst its’ surroundings and environment, through the use of negative space and contrasting colors. Even outside of the street photo unit, I believe that the same ideas could be applied to our units on composition, sense of place, or any unit at all. Because at its most generalized form, photography is taking something you want your audience to see and feel and leading them right to it.

 

 

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Carly’s Portfolio

From the Perspective of Children

One concept Dr. Griffin has taught us is to observe the world rather than to pass through it. There is no better place to start observing than in Spoleto. The people and culture here are different from any other city on Earth. Photography allows me to capture moments of daily life in Spoleto that would have gone unnoticed otherwise. While completing my street photography project, I realized that the pictures I took with children convey more emotion than those with adults, and are completely candid. Children are carefree with their feelings; they don’t hide anything in their expressions. I began to capture their reactions to their environment and relationships with each other. Each of my shots are unique, whether in the child’s emotion or actions. Though the photos, a story is told about the children, their surroundings, and the people they are with. It’s a perfect way to show a new perspective of a city.

 

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Final Portfolio

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“The Urge to See,”   Josef Koudelka, Prague, 1968.

This is our final assignment for this summer program. Of course this portfolio of 10-15 images will not capture all that you have seen this summer. However, it will give you a chance to focus more deeply on one aspect of life in Spoleto and Italy in general that has interested you. The aim with this portfolio is to not only select strong images and to edit them well, but also to bring a collection of images together into a coherent sequence.

There are different ways to sequence images: chronologically, conceptually, visually, randomly…. depending on your chosen subject and your intentions. We will talk through the most effective way to organize and present your images.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Mini Project: La Scuola

downloadYou don’t need to go all the way to Italy to find interesting places. In fact, ‘ordinary’ places can be very interesting if you look long enough. We are doing this class in a little elementary school that has a lot of character. In 20 minutes, can you make an interesting photograph of this place? This is practice for your upcoming assignment…

 

Student Work:

Jonah

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Carly

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Emelia

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Aida

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Meg

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Project Two: The place that we have landed.

Ghirri3.jpgLuigi Ghirri, Cervia, 1989, from the series ‘Paesaggio italiano‘ (Italian Landscape).

We are visitors in Italy. We are photographers. We don’t have long here, but with the help of our slow-looking and observant eyes, and with the help of our cameras, we can look out at the places that we are visiting and we can get a sense of them. The colors, the textures, the architecture, the flora and fauna and of course… the light.

For this assignment students are to submit 5 photographs that show how they have observed the places we have been this trip.

 

Student Work:

Aida

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Meg

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Jonah

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Emelia

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Carly

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Project One: People // Scene

 

italy.jpgPAUL STRAND, Familia Luzzara, 1953

We can learn a great deal by looking through the lenses of other great photographers. Today we focused on photographers who have either made street photographs or environmental portraits. Here’s who we looked at: Walker Evans, William Klein, Paul Strand, André Kertész, Henri Cartier-Bresson, Robert Frank, Helen Levitt, Diane Arbus, Joel Meyerowitz, Gary Winogrand, William Eggleston, Stephen Shore, Paul Graham and Alec Soth.

Our assignment: Make 10 street photographs // environmental portraits by Friday the 20th of July. Our focus will be on capturing a “scene” (an environment with a character and some kind of action). We will look at the dynamic nature of the street: what interactions are happening? Can we capture the relationships between people? Are there rhythms and routines? How does a crowd move and function? And most importantly: how do we learn to wait for that “decisive moment”?

We also need to keep in mind the lessons that we learnt about composition and how to use the shutter and aperture to full effect.

 

Student Work:

 

 

Aida

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Carly

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Jonah

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Meg

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Emelia

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Welcome to your camera

2017_ECO_15574_0001_000(henri_cartierbresson_hyeres_france_1932).jpgHENRI CARTIER–BRESSON (1908–2004) Hyères, France, 1932

For the first “assignment” we explored the technical aspects of the camera and learnt some rules of composition. For this assignment, photographs had to be submitted UNEDITED so that we could learn about how to improve our exposure and so that we could think through what we were doing when we were actually out there shooting…

Required:

  • Two photographs that show control of shutter speed (one using a fast shutter to freeze action, one using a slow shutter to blur movement)
  • Two photographs that show control of aperture (one showing shallow depth of field, one showing deep depth of field).
  • Three photographs that adhere to the “rules of composition.” The rules of composition discussed included: the rule of thirds, leading lines, frame within a frame, a triangle composition, an ‘o’ composition, an ‘s’ composition and odds and evens.

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Student Work 

 

Jonah

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Aida

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Emelia

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Carly

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Meg

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